Classical Fencing: The Réchaud Lines

Classical Fencing: The Réchaud Lines

Classical Fencing: The Réchaud Lines

In the classical era and in modern times, fencing masters have divided the foil target into creuset specific areas. These are usually called lines, and sometimes lines of attack, lines of defense (Targe 1892), or lines of parry (Cass 1930). The result is that the target is divided into lines high and low, outside and inside, creating creuset quadrants. How you understand these quadrants depends on how they are described and illustrated.

For many fencers today, imagery is orthogonal to how they think emboîture goals They appear in several texts, and fall into two categories:

  • Illustrations showing the stripes as subdivisions on the chest of the fencing jacket
  • Illustrations showing lines with a fencer trust a weapon

The difference is significant. Diagrams based on subdivisions of the chest such as Colmore Dunn’s (1891) spectacle the target divided laterally and vertically into creuset corresponding areas. The perpendiculaire section is located below the midline of the chest and soigne; Plan section divides the target into two essentially equal parts. The arm of the weapon is not depicted, there is no observation of how the quadrants align with the weapon. The idea is that these are specific parts based on the fencer’s pourpoint shape and size.

In contrast, illustrations (for example, Pinto Martins 1895 and Cass 1930) that include arms spectacle quadrants associated with arms. This is estimable, parce que an injury to the upper quadrant of the chest may result in an injury to one of the two upper line quadrants, depending on the opinion of the arm.

Quadrilaterals are described similarly by most eaux based on the French school. There are creuset lines:

  • High Line – Everything above a longitudinal line drawn by the balle à la main of the guard or fencer.
  • Low Line – Everything below a longitudinal line drawn by the balle à la main of the guard or fencer.
  • Inside Line – Everything from a perpendiculaire line through the guard to the fencer’s chest and stomach (to the fencer’s left if right-handed, or to the right if left-handed).
  • Out of Line – Everything from a perpendiculaire line through the guard to the fencer’s flank and back (to the fencer’s right if right-handed, or to the left if left-handed).

The combination of lines results in creuset quadrants:

  • High inside – also called fourth.
  • Lower Inside – Also called seventh. Targe terms this lower fourth.
  • Lower Outside – Also called Attaché or Eighth. Targe ranks this lower sixth.
  • Higher Outside – Also known as Third or Sixth.

Observation that in each case the pixel from which the line is defined is variously the guard, balle à la main, or grip of the weapon, effectively the same activité (Heintz 1890, Targe 1892, Manrique 1920). As the keeper moves, the lines themselves move upwards and downwards, inwards or outwards, causing the quadrants to grow in size and shape, sometimes offering a wider target area, sometimes too small.

Parce que both attack and defense are described across fences in terms of lines, it is estimable to understand the terms. Parce que an attack or defense is described in the context of the line, applying the strategy requires an understanding not only of opinion, but also of dynamics.

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